<$BlogRSDUrl$>


search
for
 About Bioline  All Journals  Testimonials  Support Bioline  News

Sunday, March 15, 2015

TOXIC METAL LEVELS NIGERIAN ELECTRONIC WASTE WORKERS INDICATE OCCUPATIONAL METAL TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH CRUDE ELECTRONIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES - Biokemistri, Vol. 26, No. 4.

Recently, The Guardian's article: "Toxic 'e-waste' dumped in poor nations, says United Nations", outlines the severity of the illegal dumping of what is being referred to as 'e-waste' within developing countries. John Vidal, who is the author of the publication, lists the many hazards of dumping discarded electronics has on both the environment and the locals. Because the areas being used as trash sites for the Wests' addiction of consumer goods, the people - often times small children - use this as a means for income. Because the locals within the exploited communities lack adequate resources, most times they burn the plastics in order to retrieve the metals. This is obviously a health risk.

Vidal goes onto state that the global volume of electronic goods is expected to grow by 33% within the next four years, and that it is now the fastest growing system of waste, with China and the US being on top for the most consumption. The European Environment Agency estimates that between 250,000 tonnes to 1.3 million tonnes of used electronic goods are illegally shipped out of the European Union each year. And while it is highly illegal to ship discarded goods to developing countries, Vidal suggests that they are falsely labeled and packaged as 'used goods' in order to get through customs.

While this is no new issue, it has to be said that it is exciting to see more attention being brought to this serious issue. Igaharo et al. in their journal: "Toxic Metal Levels Nigerian Electronic Waste Workers Indicate Occupational Metal Toxicity Associated With Crude Electronic Waste Management Practices", thoroughly evaluate the health risks associated with electronic waste metals within Nigeria.

In the study, they evaluated the toxic metal levels in Nigerians who have been occupationally exposed to e-waste. Large levels of Lead, Mercury, Arsenic, Cadmium, and Chromium were detected within the blood tests of the Nigerian e-waste workers. To unsure a non-biased study, age-matched non-exposed participants were also studied using: standard electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 

The results showed statistically significant elevated levels of toxic metals within the workers compared to the non-exposed study group (see: article for scientific measurements). Additionally, data indicated that elevated levels of toxic metals within the e-waste exposed population is directly related to the e-waste management practices within Nigeria. The potential for serious health effects, such as kidney disease and cancer; proceeded by genome instability and depressed immune response were highlighted within the study. 



For this journal and others from this issue, click here.

Labels: , , ,

1 Comments:

Blogger shobith sharma said...

IT Ewaste offers Electronic Recycling, Computer Laptop Recycling, Mobile Phone or E Waste Recycling Services.

2:22 AM  

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home

Home Faq Resources Mailing List Email Bioline
© Bioline International, 1989 - 2010,
Site created and maintained by the Reference Center on Environmental Information, CRIA, Brazil